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turkbreast3

Hello cooking extraordinaires! This post is for those among us who are less extraordinary, sometimes struggle with the workings of a kitchen but want to create the appearance of skillful accomplishment that only comes from a meal so tasty and simple, it must have taken a master to muster.

I’m Cher – Kris’ much younger sister who doesn’t know a spatula from other handled kitchen tools and sometimes sets the timer on the stove expecting the oven to preheat. Because I love to eat, and have a family who needs to eat, I have no choice but to cook – especially on those rare occasions when my husband is unavailable to. As a two-ingredient kind of girl, I’m excited to introduce you to one of my favorite meals to make…turkey sandwiches.

krischer

Before you click to a post that Kris wrote, let me assure you that these are not your average sandwiches. Not only are they made with love – and a little prayer thrown in for good measure – the meat is slow roasted for 8 to 10 hours while you enjoy your day! For us, that included morning workouts followed by a mid-day oceanside hike complete with a cliffside rescue and shopping.

rescue

By the time we arrived home, we were hungry, and our meal was nearly complete.  First, though, let me tell you how we got there – to a meal that was so good we’re still talking about it today.

The ingredients include turkey and rolls.  If you’re fancy, you can spice up the meat with whatever is contained in the jars you find by rummaging around a shelf that is high and unseen but important because of it’s ability to hide (cooks might say “store”) those things one cannot easily pronounce. Like cardamon. Or turmeric.  I prefer salt. And pepper.

To begin, take a frozen turkey breast and brown it on the stovetop. (Kris just informed me that it had been thawing in the refrigerator for two days – who knew!?) Then place it in a slow cooker on low for 8 – 10 hours.  Before you put the lid on it (because you NEVER lift the lid on a slow cooker until it’s done – this I know to be true), add a half-cup of water and some salt and pepper.  I did this, and felt my job was done.  Wiping my hands on my apron (not really – actually on my shirt), I turned away from the kitchen to go about my day.

Kris, though, knew I could do better.  She looked at me confused, and in the most encouraging of ways suggested that maybe it could use a bit more of something – anything.  Because she bought the meat, and I was making the meal for her and her family, I was open to suggestions, even though it would break my two-ingredient rule.  With knife in hand, I reached for an onion and clove of garlic.  Slicing, mincing, and dicing like a pro, I created a nice savory bed on which to lay my breast.

When we arrived home that evening, we split the hard rolls, cut up some fresh veggies and tada – dinner was done. One tiny mishap ensures a part of me will remain oceanside long after my plane lifts airborne to return me to Milwaukee: the Braunreiters will be picking up cherry tomatoes until planting season.  In putting the plates together, my enthusiasm got the best of me, so I dropped an entire pint.  Since then, they’ve been reproducing along the baseboards of Kris’ kitchen, creating a red and green border just in time for holiday decorating. (See The Caged Yellow Bird at http://www.thecagedyellowbird.wordpress.com).

Next time you have a busy day, but want a solid healthy dinner, try this recipe. Make it your own with the spices you choose, the sides you serve and the people with whom you share it. Enjoy!